Celebration

Why not put the Celebration first?

Someone wrote in recently and asked if there was any particular justification for doing Messy Church in the standard order, and why not start with the Celebration? Here’s what I said, in case it’s helpful. You may have other thoughts to add.

New Messy greetings cards

Check out the new range of Messy Church greetings cards at CPO (Christian Publishing and Outreach) including birthday, thank you, personalised and blank options.

Lucy's sabbatical musings: joy

Here's another thought about another element of our Messy Church character: joy!

Mexican and Peruvian dancers at Colorado Messy Church

Great to hear from Rev Carol Meredith at St Stephens Episcopal Church, Aurora, Colorado. Since July 2014 they have been joining up with their Latino neighbours for Messy Church and at Christmas they all explored Mexican Christmas traditions together.  First, 150 all ages celebrated Our Lady of Guadalupe, making rosaries, paper flowers and Christmas ornaments to decorate a special Altar to Our Lady. They had Mexican dancers and food.

New CD from Fischy Music

Many Messy Churches have discovered how good songs from Fischy Music can be.  Stephen Fischbacher and his team work in schools in Scotland and many of us use his songs, such as Welcome Everybody and May you find peace in our messy celebrations.

Exploring celebration

Celebration is the name we've given to the most traditional worship part of Messy Church - the 15 minutes of story, song, prayer and whatever else we bring into the gathered worship of the whole session. It's also a broader term for marking with joy or sorrow a significant event, for making that event count in our community's life. Celebration can be engaging, fun, joyful: where people's perception of church is that it is boring, we need to show them that the church worships a God who is totally engaging.

Messy Month 2012

Messy Month is a chance to celebrate and share all the Messy news and information with your other church congregations, inviting them to be part of the Messy ministry in prayerful, practical and financial ways, and to thank God for all he's doing through our Messy Churches.

Celebration stories?

Anyone got any funny, cautionary, inspirational or thought-provoking anecdotes about their Messy Celebrations you could share for a book coming out next year? As short as you like - I'm running out of word count. Send 'em to me as soon as you like. By yesterday is fine. Many thanks!

Messy Abbey

Jane and I had a great time at Dorchester Abbey on Sunday celebrating BRF's 90th anniversary as only Messy Church can. Jelly featured, but not to eat, only to try to build on, as the theme was 'Building Up!' (and the little known parable of Jesus called 'The man who built his house on the jelly'). And of course there was a wide range of activities to explore the idea of BRF building people up in their spiritual lives, the Diocese of Oxford building people up through their churches and Messy Church building up family faith and fun together, all with Christ at the centre.

Just celebrate

Philip North from London sent a very moving and generous email this week: I thought I might tell you a story. I was amongst the group you spoke to when you visited the Liturgical Commission earlier this year, and in particular I was one of those asking predictable Anglo-Catholic questions about being a Eucharistic community, what is the Church etc. However I was very struck both by the strength of the Messy Church model and by Angela Tilby's contribution to the conversation when she said, stop worrying and just celebrate all you are achieving.

Our first Messy Communion...

How very interesting. And moving. And thought-provoking. Amidst great fear and trepidation, we held our first Messy Communion last night at our Easter Messy Church. We had wondered about doing it as an Agape Meal, this having the advantage that there aren't any set Anglican rules and also that everyone would be 'allowed' to have the bread and wine. But in the end we held out for Communion on the grounds that we don't mess around with the Sunday congregation giving them what in churchy terms could be seen as second best, so why should the Thursday congregation miss out?