Messy Church

Fresh ideas for building a Christ-centred community

Faith in Homes

I hope by now you’ve seen the easy-to-use Discipleship Pilot we’ve created for Messy Churches. It’s a simple and straightforward tool to get your team talking about what you might do to make and grow disciples in your Messy Church. In this short blog, I’ll focus on the first suggestion in it: that of making disciples by encouraging families to do faith in their homes. In following blogs, we’ll look at the other suggestions.

The Messy Church team have put together a 'Maximising the Mess' guide with some helpful advice on 'Encouraging families to live out faith in the home' part 2. The guide is for families and churches to give you some reassurance about how to get started with Christianit

The Messy Church team have put together a 'Maximising the Mess' guide with some helpful advice on 'Encouraging families to live out faith in the home'. The guide is for families and churches to give you some reasurrance before you start to talk about faith in the home. 

Please take for granted all the usual caveats about being wary of what we mean by a ‘family’. For the purposes of this blog, I mean a group of people of all ages living together and more or less dependent on each other and that might mean anything from a single dad and three children from different relationships to a step family, to a mum, dad and six children to a widowed grandparent bringing up a grandchild.

This link popped up on my Twitter Feed today http://ericgeiger.com/2015/07/the-important-stats-about-our-cultural-context/#.VbcpiZXH-1t (thank you Simon Bowkett) which states in its initial summary: 52% of Americans believe worshipping alone or with one’s family is a valid replacement for regularly attending church.

Something to investigate for your Messy Church families, from Becky and Adam May at The Teasure Box People...

The Treasure Box People are delighted that three months after their successful Kickstarter campaign, the opportunity to buy their Treasure Box is now here.

Congratulations to Canford Parish Church, Wimborne, Dorset, Breakfast@9 group and St Catherine’s Church, Crook, County Durham! Both churches were inspired by Renita Boyle's Gingerbread Nativity book and baked, decorated and displayed their Nativity sets at crib festivals and services. Churches Together in Crook linked the idea with their Messy Nativity Sheep Trail.

The Gingerbread Nativity uses the popular tradition of making and decorating gingerbread houses and biscuits to explore the themes of Advent and the story of the first Christmas. It includes instructions, diagrammatic illustrations, recipes and top tips for making, baking and decorating, as well as fake or no bake and allergy-free alternatives. It also includes Advent reflection and discussion starters for each session; 25 'taste-a-day' family activities; ideas for a gingerbread themed family service and 'choose and use' ideas for adapting the material for use in other settings.

An exciting development from Sally Lingham, who has tried out Messy Church in her own home: it's getting more like the Early Church by the day! She writes:

Hi Lucy and team

An excellent new website from BRF is the Faith in Homes website, run by our colleague Jane Butcher. This is a great and useful resource for Messy Church leaders on the lookout for appropriate ways of enabling families to engage with faith at home, or to provide ideas for those content-hungry Take Home sheets. Have a wander round and see the Lent and Easter ideas already there, and do drop Jane an email with your impressions.

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